Shadyufo's Tumblr

The tumblr of Shadyufo. Here you will find dead stuff, art, and dead stuff AS art!
Bad Teeth

Bad Teeth

Dirty doe skull going for a ride.

I forgot to post pics of this boy all finished up! This is another skull my awesome farrier brought for me. It’s from a Polish Arabian horse and he was only around four years old when he died of natural although unknown causes.

The dogs of the lady that owned him gnawed part of his left orbit and the tip of his nasal bones off but he’s in great shape other than that. Love those fangs!

Horse Howl

Horse Howl

Just finished cleaning the Crooked Doe, couple of roadkill squirrels, and an otter skeleton. Time for gluing and sorting now!

Just finished cleaning the Crooked Doe, couple of roadkill squirrels, and an otter skeleton. Time for gluing and sorting now!

Pretty little collection of oddities. For sale in my Etsy shop!

This young buck is such a cute little dork. Looking forward to painting him.

This young buck is such a cute little dork. Looking forward to painting him.

Still Water

Still Water

fischotterchen asked: Would you happen to know whether bones require any priming before painting them with acrylics, or can you just paint right on them once they're clean?

mydeadthingsdiary:

I honestly have little to no experience in painting bones so I’m going to have to invoke the wonderful shadyufo to answer this question!

I paint straight onto the bone. I primed a few when I first started out but it didn’t make much of a difference so I just cut that step out. Just make sure they are nice and clean and you’ll be good to go! And seal them when you are done to keep the paint from getting scraped off or damaged. I like this varnish made by Liquitex but there are some aerosol can varnishes that work well too. So long as they are meant for acrylic paint they’ll be fine.

Good luck and happy painting! :)

Anonymous asked: how can you tell a raccoon skull from a badger skull?

Raccoons have more teeth. Usually around forty while badgers generally only have thirty-four. Badger skulls are much more robust than raccoon skulls too and both halves of their lower jaws are almost always fused together, except in very young individuals. Raccoon lower jaws almost never fuse.

Here’s some pics so you can see for yourself! These aren’t perfect specimens and are missing some teeth but you can still see the differences between them.

image

image

image