The tumblr of Shadyufo. Here you will find dead stuff, art, and dead stuff AS art!

 

Anonymous asked
What kind of camera do you use? Those chicken pictures are on point.

Hey thank you so much! I actually just have an old Kodak Easyshare C180. It’s battered and bruised but it still takes pretty decent photos. I’ve had a couple of them over the years and they are tough little cameras. I dropped one in the creek and despite being submerged in the muddy water for ten seconds+ it was totally fine after it dried out.

I’d still love to get a nicer camera someday though! One with a good macro lens.

The Nuggets had a blast out in Molly’s pen again. They were braver this time and ventured out into the overgrown remains of the big garden and under the apples trees. It’s so much fun to follow them around and see what they get into.

They did a really great job helping me dig up potatoes, haha.

Couple of gorgeous fossilized Great White Shark teeth. These are just like teeth from modern great whites, only a few thousand years older.
Even though these are ancient they are still sharp and serrated like steak knifes.

Couple of gorgeous fossilized Great White Shark teeth. These are just like teeth from modern great whites, only a few thousand years older.

Even though these are ancient they are still sharp and serrated like steak knifes.

mister-mind said: Do you know how much shipping to Europe might cost..?

It’ll depend on the final size and weight of the book but I’ll do my best to keep it as affordable as possible. :)

Anonymous asked
when you are done with it do you know how much your book will be?

I’d planned to just have a little booklet, sorta like a big comic book, and put them all together myself but now it’s to the point where I think I might have them professionally printed and bound with a soft cover. I’ve still got a lot of illustrations to do so it will be a while longer before they are done but I’m planning to have them available for around $20-25 plus shipping when they are ready unless something drastically changes. I’ll probably still offer a PDF download on Etsy too.

It will cover basic anatomy, have illustrations of a TON different skulls from animals all around the world, show the differences between the bones of lots of different species, numerous methods of cleaning, and so, so much more. :)

Anonymous asked
hey there!! about two years ago i buried my bearded dragon in my backyard after he died - thing is, we had wrapped him up in a rag and sealed him in a ziplock bag. i know he'd already started decomposing by the time we got him in there (as he was already all bloated), do you think he'd be done decomposing by now or should i wait a little longer before digging him up? i was also concerned that he might've been jerkified but part of me doubts that

i’d just hate to dig him up early, open the bag - and get a face full of rotted lizard stench. not really the way i wanna remember him, y’know?

Hi! So sorry to hear about the loss of your bearded dragon, Anon!

After a couple of years he’s probably about as deteriorated as he’s gonna get underground in the bag. If I were you I would carefully exhume him but before opening the bag gently feel of him to see if he feels like he’s down to bones yet or not. Even if he is mostly down to bones there will likely still be some remaining tissue left so just be prepared for that.

When you feel of him through the bag and it feels like he might still have a ways to go then you could try just re-burying everything, bag and all, into a flower pot of loose earth. Poke a few small holes in the bag, keep the soil fairly damp, and maybe drizzle a little water onto the rag in the bag. Humidity and dampness is your friend for decomp. You can cover the flower pot with a heavy rock or some mesh wire to keep anything from digging into it. If the weather is warm enough he’ll probably be done in a few weeks or a month.

After that, just take the bones out, rinse them off in some warm soapy water, degrease them if they look like they need it, soak in peroxide, then you should be good to go!

Hope that helps! Best of luck and feel free to ask if you have any other questions!

Soaked these little bits and pieces in some beet juice the other day just to see what would happen. I like the results! Subtle but really pretty and sort of antiqued-looking. The gar scales are my favs.

Soaked these little bits and pieces in some beet juice the other day just to see what would happen. I like the results! Subtle but really pretty and sort of antiqued-looking. The gar scales are my favs.

bonedahlia asked
For your anon about the degreasing: There have been a number of times I've had to degrease skulls in room temperature water. It may take longer and you'll need to change the water out for hot water more often but it has worked okay for me in the past.

Hey thanks for the message! Publishing it so Anon can see. :)

I’ve never had much luck with room temps myself but every skull cleaning experience is different!

I degreased ol’ Carlos my lady cougar skull in a bathroom sink with just hot tap water. It took forever with lots and lots of water/soap changes to keep the water hot but it did do the trick after a few thousand years, haha.

Anonymous asked
This is the anon asking about degreasing temp. I'm not sure if I'll be able to get a fish tank heater or whatever to regulate the temperature of the the degreasing water. Is there any other way I can degrease bones? Boiling? If so, for how long? Thanks in advance :)

Hey there!

Boiling is something you really want to avoid at all costs when it comes to skull cleaning. Like bleach it’s really far too harsh for cleaning skulls. The extreme heat can actually set the grease into the bone instead of removing it as well cause damage to the skull.

Some folks will simmer skulls (115 degrees Fahrenheit is really about as high as you want to go for degreasing) to degrease them but it really seems to be a crap shoot and you hear mixed results. Some have great results, some have ruined skulls. A bigger, solid skull like a coyote or pig would probably do alright but simmering small skulls like rabbits or squirrels should likely be avoided.

And a word of warning; degreasing does smell bad sometimes. So if you plan to do it indoors definitely be prepared for that.

Again, sometimes you can do just fine using the hot summer sun to degrease if your climate is warm enough. Paint your bucket black to help absorb more heat and keep it out in direct sunlight.